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Wednesday
Aug232006

Diverse Female Beauty from Dove

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What do you think of the Dove Real Beauty campaign?

Would you like to see more diverse images of feminine beauty? Does it make you feel more confident about your own beauty?

For a positive video experience exposing the follies of the media world click on this icon:

Reader Comments (35)

I think the campaign has good intentions. But telling women their bodies are lovely no matter what on an ad to firm up "flawed" body parts seems a bit contradictory/hypocritical. They're still selling a product.
January 6, 2007 | Unregistered CommenterMaria
Dove tries to occupy the concept of natural beauty by representing these extremely accurately picked models (of various sizes). These models are not your average neighbourhood women. This can be proven by taking a walk downtown and comparing these models to passer-bys.
We must not be contended by Dove when they include women of various sizes in their ads because there's still so much to do and the whole concpet of this ad creates problems of its own (you don't still look like them, first of all, because you don't have professional photographers, army of hair stylists and make-up artists to bring out what is seen as best of you).
January 9, 2007 | Unregistered CommenterLuther Blissett
I live in Central Europe as well but grew up in the States. A reader above posted a response I can certainly identify with: Women here do in fact starve themselves instead of exercising their bodies. It is nice of Dove to show women who are curvey, but the problem is that it won't make much of a difference till girls like that are shown on the runway wearing major labels like Gucci. Dove is not into fashion. Forgive me but one positive commercial does not compensate for the abuse I and other girls have received in our lifetimes. The damage is done. Now it is in the hands of every female to accept and love herself as God made her. But to be honest. Is the fashion industry or any industry really interested in making anyone feel good about themselves? It seems money is made only when we feel we somehow should improve our image...why would we reach for any product if we were really happy with the way we looked?
January 16, 2007 | Unregistered CommenterAga
Yeah! Dove...I love that commercial. It really makes me feel good personally and proud of women in total, every time I see it. We are just so beautiful in every size and shape aren't we! This is the type of advertising we need to support worldwide. Ladies let your wallet do the talking...DON"T BUY FROM COMPANIES THAT EXPLOIT THE FEMALE FORM!
February 1, 2007 | Unregistered CommenterArtnick
I agree with a few of the comments above, especially those by Emily & Sandra. I didn't know for years that women in media advertisements & glamour photos were brushed up, that is to say that it is not always their own 'true' body. I feel women have had too much glamour & sex shoved in their faces for far too long & the problem is becoming steadily worse, making young girls below the age of 16 fear that they look abnormal, need boob jobs, etc.. The catwalk girls are too thin, many of the glamour models show big boobs & very thin waists, which is surely not normal either? The 'Dove' girls have been dressed by a professional, in order that they look good, whatever their size or shape, but no, I've not seen any stretch marks or scars, which many of us have on our bodies & make us what we are. Being sexy is more a state of mind & feeling than how thin you are, more to do with your own body confidence & comfort with your own unque shape. It is about time women stood up for themselves, without being labelled as extreme feminists. Feminism after all, is about being feminine & appreciating who we are as women.
February 7, 2007 | Unregistered CommenterTracey
I agree with a few of the comments above, especially those by Emily & Sandra. I didn't know for years that women in media advertisements & glamour photos were brushed up, that is to say that it is not always their own 'true' body. I feel women have had too much glamour & sex shoved in their faces for far too long & the problem is becoming steadily worse, making young girls below the age of 16 fear that they look abnormal, need boob jobs, etc.. The catwalk girls are too thin, many of the glamour models show big boobs & very thin waists, which is surely not normal either? The 'Dove' girls have been dressed by a professional, in order that they look good, whatever their size or shape, but no, I've not seen any stretch marks or scars, which many of us have on our bodies & make us what we are. Being sexy is more a state of mind & feeling than how thin you are, more to do with your own body confidence & comfort with your own unque shape. It is about time women stood up for themselves, without being labelled as extreme feminists. Feminism after all, is about being feminine & appreciating who we are as women.
February 7, 2007 | Unregistered CommenterTracey
I love Dove's Real Beauty campaign, from the models' body weight to the gorgeous older models, or the strikingly beautiful girl with all the freckles.

The thing that makes me sad is how, when a Dove Real Beauty commercial comes on in the movie theater, or drives by on the side of a bus, my boyfriend goes, "Oh my god!! Gross!!"

There are a lot of opinions to be changed. The most important are the opinions of women themselves, but what about the people whose reactions matter to us most? It's pretty hard to feel good about yourself when your significant other sees women in advertising that look like you... and he thinks they're ugly.
April 2, 2007 | Unregistered CommenterElaine
I am really suspicious of these ads. Dove obviously realises that there's a small scale revolution going on about women and beauty, and they're trying to tap into that. I don't mind that these women are physically exposed, since I don't think they're being over sexualised or placed within a degrading visual narrative. What's wrong with standing around in your undies? Nothing, I believe.
I don't like how a beauty product is trying to tell us you look good the way you are - but uh, buy our stuff so you look better, ok? It feels like hypocrisy, and it fells like a scam. These women are beautiful, I enjoy seeing them on television, and I'm proud of them. I just wish they weren't trying to sell me things. I believe I can *feel* as beautiful as they *look* without trying to firm away my cellulite.
May 7, 2007 | Unregistered CommenterPhysalia
I LOVE the dove campaigns, the women are really beautiful, and they look like regular women.
July 9, 2008 | Unregistered CommenterLauren
Models are real women too, you know! I'm not a model but I am tall and slim, and guess what, I still have curves, they're just on a smaller scale. I loathe the euphemism 'curvy' for larger women - all women have curves to varying degrees! I also think that by portraying these as 'real' women, Dove are still maintaining the idea that models are somehow special and different - and possibly, therefore, superior. I think it would work better to have a big group of women of ALL different shapes and sizes, including some conventional models - showing that other women can look just as good as them. And before we get too excited, let's remember Dove are a business trying to sell things to us. I don't mean to sound harsh, I guess overall it's a step in the right direction...
August 7, 2008 | Unregistered CommenterCharlotte
I have a real issue with Dove. They are one of the leaders of making whitening creme products in Asia. If they were into real beauty, why would the created products for lightening skin?! and these whitening products do have a history of permanently damaging skin. And just to have a more Western look to their skin.
This is not a known fact in the USA.
April 22, 2010 | Unregistered Commenternot a fan
Their examples make us more confident. http://www.astrabeds.com
September 29, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterSusan
Thanks for this article, AnyBody.

I really like the Dove ad campaign.

This image represents a huge departure from the image of stick thin and skinny models that is often pertrayed in the media.

In this ad, you can see what you may consider to be a normal / average woman you see each and every day.

Most women look like the women in this ad.

I think other companies should start presenting the average women in their ads, not the super skinny women.

I love this!!

Thanks

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